On to step three

We got a preliminary settlement from our insurance company — preliminary in that it doesn’t included ALL the repairs we need because we aren’t in the right place to have them estimated and done — but our replacement rig is covered and taken care of. We’re delighted to have cleared this hurdle and called our rigger, Colin Mack of Mack Sails and he got us “in the queue” for our new mast and boom. These are the things that will take the longest so we wanted to get the process started as soon as possible.

I say “step three” because it’s been helpful to our sanity since the dismasting to think of the daunting task of getting back out there as a series of smaller, more manageable steps. Step one was getting to a place where we could get the rig shipped in and the work done. That in itself was a mighty accomplishment, and perhaps the toughest. We took a beating, mentally, physically and financially, and Escape Velocity also suffered from the 1200 miles of motoring. But ever since we arrived in Costa Rica we’ve known that no matter what, everything is possible. Not because it’s so easy here to get things done — it isn’t — but because we don’t feel as isolated as we did in the Galapagos. Having reliable Internet and cell phone service helps, too.

Step two was starting the process of the insurance claim, and while we would have preferred a quick payoff from the manufacturer of the part that failed on us, our surveyor and insurance company and everyone involved in our claim have been nothing short of kind, helpful and supportive. Once we had the survey and the estimate done the claims people got to work and very quickly finished the process.

Now we can busy ourselves getting things ordered, take a break from worrying and start to enjoy this beautiful country. We’re hampered somewhat by the fact that Escape Velocity is not able to go anywhere until we have the engines fixed. Neither problem is serious but getting the parts we need is challenging here in Golfito. What’s more of a problem even than not being able to go anywhere is that we can’t even run an engine to top up our batteries. We never used to think about power because we usually run completely off solar energy but here in Golfito, in the “green” season, we get less than half a day of sunshine, not enough to keep us fully charged. The situation is not dire — yet — but we sure hope Robert, the only diesel mechanic around these parts, can come up with a regulator for the starboard engine so we can charge up the battery bank. The port engine is leaking diesel from the bleed screw despite an attempted fix with a locally sourced screw. We have the correct screws coming from the States next week, but in the meantime, we can’t use that engine either, unless it’s an emergency.

All in good time.

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Meanwhile we’re enjoying being able to watch the World Cup and Formula 1 races and the French Open either streaming online or at the bar ashore. We’re getting lots of little projects done and I’ve even dug out my jewelry-making supplies for some blissful crafting hours. Guitar pick earrings!

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Life is pretty good.

4 Comments

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4 Responses to On to step three

  1. Marjorie

    Kindly insurance people. You must live under a lucky star! Good luck with everything.

  2. Robert Jarris

    You are in good hands with Colin. He did my rigging inspection and is a go to guy to get things done.

  3. I can see from your last photo that you are enjoying “hanging out” in Costa Rica! heh heh Guys… keep in mind that I have a complete engine and most of a second one that came out of Summer Wind. Let me know if you need some heavily discounted parts. I also have at least one if not both of the mastervolt regulators which we discontinued when I put the high-output additional alternator on the Starboard engine. Also if you get desperate enough you can rig a temporary circuit by putting a 12 volt bulb in series between ground and your field connector on the alternator (this is assuming it’s an “N” type alternator which the mastervolt setups were). With that you have to keep a close eye on voltage and stop it before your system voltage gets to 15 volts or thereabouts. Feel free to call me 6672071015.

  4. Jon N

    Can you please share who your insurance carrier and broker are? It sounds like they have treated you well. Thanks!

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